Category Archives: With Family

Fun times with Daddy

I am officially on a filmmaking kick. It took my 3 years of procrastination, but once I got over the hump, I became hooked.

It’s interesting how filming activities with my kids enriches the experience. This happens for a couple reasons. One, typically Brenda isn’t there with my and the boys when we’re doing something worth filming and so me and the boys want to show off for Brenda to show the video to her when we’re done. Two, because it’s all hands free, I get to be completely immersed in what we’re doing and be a full participant while still knowing that I am capturing it on film. Three, I am obviously not on my phone, wasting time or being a piece of crud dad being physically there but mentally away because, frankly, I want to make the video cool and worth watching and worth showing to Brenda.

In the film below, you will see a couple scenes. One, is just simple biking with Ashton near our house in Saratoga Springs. Another is of me and Ashton out back at this little dirt hill. A third is Oliver, Ashton and I at the Ranches Mountain Bike Park and surrounding foothills, doing some BMX and mountain biking. Obviously, I am doing all the work there! Lastly, is a super heroes (the kids) vs super villain (me, as Darth Vader) fight for Ashton’s 5th b-day.

In the intro, Brenda is asking the kids, “so what did you guys do this week?” and they respond, “oh, nothing!” But, the sound doesn’t really come in unless you jack up the volume.

Enjoy.

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Snowbird Power Day Video…Awesome

My brother Dallin and I hit up Snowbird in late February for a powder day. It was really an almost perfect day. Fresh powder, blue skies, few people, lots of hiking and great lines all day. Below is my first ever edited video from my GoPro.

I have procrastinated editing a lot, and I mean a lot, of footage because, frankly, I knew it would take forever. And it did! 5 hours later, I have successfully taken 30 minutes of raw footage to a 4 minute, awe-inspiring, adrenaline-filled masterpiece.

OK, so its not a masterpiece. It’s my first video, ever. It was hard. But, despite its amateurishness, I love it and think it is rad.

Hope you like it. Enjoy.

P.S. I know “starring” is misspelled and yes it’s embarrassing. Too focused on video editing that I forgot text editing.

But, it’s still rad 🙂

Momia Juanita, or Part 3 of Visions of Peru

One of the really neat things we got to see in Peru was the Momia Juanita, or Juanita Mummy housed in the Catholic University’s Museum of Andean Sanctuaries (Museo Santuarios Andinos).

Juanita is the well-preserved body of a young girl who was actually killed as a human sacrifice to the Incan gods. She is about 1500 years old. What makes her so cool is that she was discovered high in the Andean mountains, and was thus frozen and very well preserved. She is a little scary looking, but very fascinating.

Me with Juanita
Me with Juanita
Juanita Story, as told in the museum.
Juanita Story, as told in the museum.

Beyond just Juanita, we toured the city of Arequipa. It is an incredible city and civilization, sitting high on the altiplano at 8000+ feet. It sits at the foot of two peaks, Mount Ampato and Misty, both of which rise nearly 20,000 feet. And they are rather tame for the Andes!

Me, Brenda, Fam & Extended Fam living in Arequipa
Me, Brenda, Fam & Extended Fam living in Arequipa

One memorable, or not so memorable, moment was when Leon and I, who are decent soccer players, got whooped by a 7 year old boy and his former professional soccer playing dad. The dad was good, but the son was a future pro, for sure! The 8000 foot altitude didn’t help 🙂

Puno: Heading Out to Another World, or Part 2 of Visions of Peru

Over a three week period in 2008, my family and I had the chance to experience the incredible diversity of Peru. A couple weeks ago I described the experience in going to see the Condors in Colca Canyon, which was awesome. Another super cool trip was to Puno, to go visit the Uru people on the floating islands of Lake Titicaca. Leon, Richard (my father-in-law) and I made the trek, as the harsh climate and altitude weren’t for everyone in our group, some of whom were suffering from a cold.

Leon and I headed to Los uros
Leon and I headed to Los Uros. It was mind-blowing.

We started out in Puno, on the edge of the lake. Puno sits at 12,556 feet! The extremes in the temperatures are harsh and it is not a climate for the soft. The town itself is super cool, with a beautiful central plaza and cathedral, looking out towards the lake. The lake, the largest in South America by volume, is absolutely enormous! The shoreline is almost 700 miles long, its over 100 miles long and 50 miles wide. It is unbelievably big.

Leon and I in the central Puno plaza. Despite it's tropical latitude, at 12,000+ feet, we needed sweatshirts
Leon and I in the central Puno plaza. Despite it’s tropical latitude, at 12,000+ feet, we needed sweatshirts
This gives you some sense of how big this lake is
This gives you some sense of how big this lake is

Also nearby to Puno are the Sillustani Towers, a pre-Incan burial ground for the Colla people, who, like pretty much anyone alive in the region, were conquered by the Incas. The Incas were mean motor scooters. The burial grounds are on the edge of Lake Umayo, providing for some really cool views.

We stopped to pay for a picture with Llama at a Puno overlook on way to Sillustani Towers
We stopped to pay for a picture with Llama at a Puno overlook on way to Sillustani Towers
Leon and I, with Lake Titicaca in background
Leon and I, with Lake Titicaca in background
Leon and I, with Lake Umayo in background
Leon and I, with Lake Umayo in background
Leon and I with a chullpa, or burial tower, which have all been raided. Some were 15+ feet high
Leon and I with a chullpa, or burial tower. Some were 15+ feet high.
Its a bad shot, but this gives you a sense of how big some of the towers are.
Its a bad shot, but this gives you a sense of how big some of the towers are.

When I say visiting the Uros are like going to another world, I mean it- you travel back in time to almost the primordial soup! I’ve never personally experienced a more primitive culture, and what’s more is that the group that I visited was actually the modernized group, the ones living closest to the city of Puno. There is another group of people that live hours from Puno by boat way out in the middle of Lake Titicaca who are even more primitive. That said, they don’t reject modern technology wholly and I’m sure there are actually more primitive people in the Amazon jungles and whatnot. But for me, their culture was a pretty wild experience.

An Uru island neighborhood. They catch fish in those nets.
An Uru island neighborhood. They catch fish in those nets.
The watch tower on the largest island is made entirely of reeds
The watch tower on the largest island is made entirely of reeds
The water is shallow enough for long poles push against the bottom to propel the boats
The water is shallow enough for long poles push against the bottom to propel the boats

We had the opportunity to visit a number of different islands. The Uru people abandoned their language a long time ago and now speak Spanish, as far as I could tell. Richard and Leon could converse with them and were able to ask a bunch of questions on my behalf!

We rode in these super cool reed boats. I bought a couple really colorful 5" replicas to take back home
We rode in these super cool reed boats. I bought a couple really colorful 5″ replicas to take back home
We had an awesome time and it was sad to leave the islands
We had an awesome time and it was sad to leave the islands

The trip to Puno was pretty much perfect. The weather was fantastic, with clear blue skies and clean air. We had the chance to explore Puno, to eat amazing, traditional Peruvian dishes, visit the Sillustani Towers and meet the Uru people. All in a day’s work 🙂

Albion Basin: Family-friendly Jaunt

The accessibility of Utah hikes to major metropolitan areas is unparalleled. Going from the hustle and bustle of city life to the cool, relaxing clime of the mountains, in less than a half hour, is invigorating. And many of the hikes are extremely accessible and family friendly. One of these is the hike to Cecret Lake up Albion Basin. We hiked it in June of ’09, right after Snowbird closed for the season. Had I brought my skis, I could have skied in the morning and wakeboarded in the afternoon! Pretty awesome.

Me and ashton in Albion
Me and ashton in Albion, …of course my eyes are closed!

The hike was a blast. At the time, it was just Brenda, Ashton and I and Ashton was less than a year old. My sister Alisha came along with my sister Janelle and her husband, Bryan and my brother Dallin and his wife Shannon.

The dirt road exiting from the Albion Basin parking lot quickly turned to snow. I had always wanted to be up in Albion Basin at this time of year. While we were too early for the flowers, which are famous up there, we did catch the bright greens of foliage meet the bright white of the snow, something I had always wanted to see for myself. It wasn’t quite like the contrast of New Zealand or the Alps, but it as still spectacular.

A happy start surrounded by friends and nature
A happy start surrounded by friends and nature

It was a carefree day. My family is very talkative, and we were all just engrossed in conversation, moving from the surroundings to the politics to business to future plans to homes and who knows what else. Over every ridge, the conversation would be interrupted by me exclaiming how beautiful everything was. Brenda would roll her eyes as it was still the same as last time!

At top of sunnyside with fam
At top of sunnyside with fam

We ended the hike at the top of Sunnyside. What a difference a simple 800 vertical feet makes in the weather! We had only brought light clothing and the 9400′ crest was exposed to the wind rushing up the canyon. It’s crazy- as we descended, it seemed like the temperature rose with every step. We didn’t get to finish our lunch up top as we were all huddled up trying to block the wind, so we ate and talked and sometimes yelled excitedly as we descended.

Ashton kept a smile on pretty much the whole time. I think he was the star of the show. He was so happy. He was born to love the outdoors. He was surrounded by awesome vistas, had his favorite toy, a free ride and most of his favorite people in his world with him, so why wouldn’t he be?!

Ashton as happy as can be!
Ashton as happy as can be!

Los Condores: A Journey, or Part 1 of Visions of Peru

This is the first in the Daily Dream series. Daily Dreams are meant to take us to a place that not everyone may have the opportunity to personally visit. One place that I never thought I’d visit was Peru. That all changed when I married a Peruvian, whose family made vising the fatherland a condition of approving the marriage 🙂

Brenda, Lorin and fam at Machu Picchu
Ha! Brenda is prego with Ashton. I’m not sure what all we’re doing in this shot

There are many reasons for visiting Peru. For the surfer, there are found some of the longest rides in the world, including Chicama, which is the longest left-handed ride in the world. For the mountain climber, there is Huaraz, the main center for beginning treks in the Cordillera Blanca, in which is found Huarascaran, highest peak in Peru and 6th in South America, at a whopping 22,205 feet, and Alpamayo, which was declared the most beautiful mountain in the world in an international survey by climber Tonni Hiebler. For the archaeologist, there is of course Machu Picchu (stay tuned for later post). For the anthropologist, Lake Titicaca, with Los Uros people inhabiting the lake’s floating islands (stay tuned for later post). And for the ornithologist (my original ambition as a young kid, actually), there are Los Condores. All in all, Peru is an adventurer’s dream.

Huarascaran above the clouds. We didn't get to visit. Next time?
Huarascaran above the clouds. Img credit: http://images.summitpost.org/original/825745.JPG
Set after Set after Set of perfect lefts
If I had grown up surfing in Chicama, instead of NJ, I think I woulda been a pro. Img credit: http://www.holydieexplorer.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Longest-Wave-in-Chicama.jpg
Leon and I headed to Los uros
Leon and I headed to Los Uros. It was mind-blowing.

The most spectacular excursion of this incredible trip was the one to see Los Condores. I studied humanities in college, and in humanities, whether its in music or literature or art, there is a story, there is structure. There is a beginning, middle, climax, and conclusion. There is adversity and triumph. And there are people. Our trek enjoyed all those elements, which is what made it so memorable for me.

Not everyone was physically able to go see the Condors, including my wife, who was pregnant with Ashton. As such, it was Richard, my father in law, Chris and Ricky, two of my brothers in law, and I who embarked.

At Arequipa Airport, with Misty in the background
At Arequipa Airport, with Misty in the background

We started our journey in Arequipa, which sits above 8,000 feet. We went with a tour group, riding in a 16-passenger van with folks from Netherlands, Germany, Spain and Argentina. Reaching Colca Canyon, where the Condors nest, required two days. The first leg of the drive involved nearly 8,000 feet of ascent!

The rise in altitude was particularly hard on Chris and a couple of others in the group, such as those from the Netherlands, who literally came from below sea level. We stopped at this outpost on the altiplano to buy some Mate tea, which helps with altitude sickness; take pictures with the Llamas (and I think Vicuna) and stretch our legs. Chris’ pain reached the point where I thought we should maybe turn back. He was pale in the face and had thrown-up more than once. I give the little guy credit for toughing it out.

Shortly after departing we encountered haggard, half-bent grandmothers carrying what looked like 60 pounds of hand-made vestiture for sale. I bought some super cool matching gloves and scarf plus a hat. I thought it was all incredible stuff and dirt cheap when converted to dollars. I was flabbergasted by these two old ladies walking alone on the altiplano in the middle of nowhere along a seemingly interminable highway to sell some clothing for like 10 soles. What a will to survive. I paid whatever the asking price was. Back in the van, Richard laughed so hard because apparently I had been ripped off. In my mind, though, I was willing to pay whatever they asked just to say I bought something from two of the most determined ladies I had ever met.

Chris and Richard at the rest-stop after drinking some Mate
Chris and Richard pose at the rest stop with Llamas, after getting their fill of Mate

Along the way we saw huge herds of Vicuna in the high plateaus. They were incredible, very graceful, very peaceful and undisturbed. The high-point of the first day’s drive, both physically and emotionally, was reaching the summit of the crest of the road’s winding path through the mountains. It topped out over 16,000 feet and the views were spectacular. Chris was still feeling nauseous, but the Mate and the views were working.

Chris on a frozen waterfall or something, ~16,000 feet up!
Chris on a frozen waterfall or something, ~16,000 feet up!
Andean Views at 16,000 feet
Andean Views at 16,000 feet.
Ricky celebrating man over nature
Ricky celebrating his triumph of surviving the car ride to the top 🙂

From the apex, we descended down to Chivay. The descent made everyone feel a little better, especially Chris. On the ride to the crest, everyone was bustling with activity. We made friends with everyone in the car, especially the Spaniards, who had only recently been married. I was particularly interested in the Spaniards’ honeymoon in New Zealand. They really got me excited to visit there. In contrast, the descent to Chivay was quiet, contemplative and restful.

Chivay sits at over 11,800 feet. So, we slept on the top of Mount Timpanogos for the night! The weather patterns there are ones of extremes. Daytime warmth turns to bone-chilling cold very quickly. The paper-thin walls of our hotel called for sleeping in our clothes, jacket and all. Luckily I had brought my ski jacket. Unlucky for Chris and Ricky, they did not. Unfortunately, both were feeling the effects of head colds combined with altitude sickness the next morning.

The bright sun coming up over the mountains and the anticipation of the day’s adventure improved everyone’s spirits. The tour guide did a great job of making all aspects of the drive from Chivay to Colca Canyon memorable. They made time to stop and appreciate the culture and history of Chivay and the surrounding environs, which deepened the experience.

Beautiful church outside of Chivay
Beautiful church outside of Chivay
Making life in the middle of nowhere!
Making life in the middle of nowhere!
Richard and Chris with this call arch spanning over the highway into Chivay
Richard and Chris with this call arch spanning over the highway into Chivay

Finally getting under way to the real prize, the condors of Colca Canyon was not the climax. Arriving at the overlook to see the condors was not the climax. Not even seeing a condor in the shadowy depths of the canyon or the lofty skies above was not the climax. The climax came when we experienced the true grandeur of these magnificent creatures swooping right over our heads. What a sight. What an experience. To be in Peru, in the Andes, at over 12,000 feet, sharing the view with the Condors in all their natural splendor was otherworldly in feeling.

Great shot of condor with white neck and knobby head
Great shot of condor with white neck and knobby head

We all sat and enjoyed the scenery, the serenity and the majesty. It was fun to be with family and newfound friends.

Me and Colca Canyon
Me and Colca Canyon
The crew: Richard, Chris, Ricky and me
The crew: Richard, Chris, Ricky and me
Richard, Chris and me on ledge at Cruz del Condor
Richard, Chris and me on ledge at Cruz del Condor
Andean Condors above Colca
Andean Condors above Colca
Two Andean Condors with Plateau in back
Two Andean Condors with Plateau in back
Shining brilliance from the Condor
Andean Condor from Above, with brilliant white/black wings
Condor in flight, up close, and from above, with full black/brown plummage
Condor in flight, up close, and from above, with full black/brown plummage
Condor soaring free
Condor soaring free
Two Condors enjoying the air and wide expanse
Two Condors enjoying the wide expanse
Condor with light streaming off its back
Condor with light streaming off its back

The return to Arequipa was memorable for the people. It was really fun to hear everyone’s story. The car was a hive ofconversation, excitement and “did-you-see-that-one” questions. The group from Netherlands was backpacking through South America, the Germans were on enjoying their summer break and the couple from Spain were continuing to see the world during their honeymoon stage. They were all really great and fun people to have on such an excursion.

As for me, I was on cloud9.

Me on lookout above Colca
Me on lookout above Colca